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other point that i want to make and that is that my understanding is tomorrow is representative boehner's birthday. for those who want to wish him a happy birthday, we're not going to embarrass him with a cake because we didn't know how many candles were needed -- >> yeah, right. >> but we do want to wish him a happy birthday. >> thank you. >> thank you, everybody. appreciate it. >> house and senate leaders spoke briefly to reporters. >> good morning, everyone. we had a very constructive meeting with the president to talk about america's fiscal problem. i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. i believe that the framework that i have outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's call for a fair and balanced approach. to show our seriousness, we have put revenue on the table as long it's accompanied by significant spending cuts. while we're going to continue to have revenue on the table, it's going to be incumbent for my colleagues to show the american people that we're serious about cutting spending and solving our fisc
driving the decisions made here. i think citing i believe speaker boehner, it's fair to say that the president also believes we don't -- he's not looking to box himself in or box other people's ideas out. as we approach the conversation that will be in on friday. >> suggest to the meeting that just took place they might have to give up more than they would like? >> i think the president has made very clear that everyone, throughout this process, not just in this past week since the election, but for some time now, that the whole point of compromise is that nobody gets to achieve their maximalist position. that was the approach we took throughout negotiations in 2011 and it's the principle the president has based his own proposals on. if you look at, again, the programs that the president has already cut through legislation he signed into law, if you look at the savings he's willing to enact as part of his plan, it demonstrates a willingness to give so that you can meet your negotiating partner somewhere in the middle and reach a deal. >> you don't have any specific -- >> i d
incomes now and ensuring security for the future. hthis is the end of vision that speaker boehner without for the country last week. i cannot think why the present would not embrace it. someone said we should go over the cliff. just go off of the cliff. hope for the best. i do not think that is what the american people had in mind when they went to the polls last week. but they had in mind is that we put the contest of the past two years behind us and work it out. the best way forward in the way that will lead to jobs and growth, a smaller deficits, and you were political fights is to keep everyone where they are. figure out a way to avoid the automatic defense cuts scheduled to hit at the end of the year without putting a penny last thing we promised and committed to the entitlement reforms that we all claim we want. a simpler tax code that lowers rates and cuts special interest loopholes would create jobs and result in more revenue without raising anyone's rates. we know this because we have seen it before. it actually works. i do not think washington should get any of that extra revenu
john boehner, have shifted in recent days, and they are talking more about their openness, much more so than they were before the election. they are saying that they are open to revenue, but only in the formal closing loopholes, not raising rates. host: the front page of "politico," you can check that out. stephen sloan, what is the likelihood that both sides agreed to a short-term deal or a long-term deal in the last 50 days of the lame-duck session? host: -- caller: people want a deal, but the question is if both sides can take the pain that it will take to get to the deal. i am not sure that either side is willing to take that kind of pain. you could still go over the cliff. host: anything else on the agenda this week, as negotiations kickoff? caller: tomorrow night this will be the first time that lawmakers are on capitol hill since september. basically, lawmakers will be talking amongst themselves about negotiations with the white house. host: stephen sloan, thank you so much for joining us this morning. caller: thank you. host: we're going now to tom, from columbus, ohio. we're di
to look at what prominent republicans have been saying about this since the election. john boehner said, a couple of days after the election, that it was time to work on this reform. this got his caucus irritated. host: let's show the folks some of what he said in that statement. [video clip] >> i am not talking about a seven page bill. i am talking about a comprehensive approach to fixing the borders and a broken immigration system. again, on an issue this big, the president has to leave. i think members on both sides of the aisle want to resolve this issue. host: you said that his caucus was surprised by this statement? guest: from louisiana they put out a statement saying that he was upset about many of the things that boehner said, not just immigration, but conversations on the debt in the next couple of weeks. this problem has been in the house since long before the tea party showed up. the rank-and-file get a little bit nervous, understandably. i think that some of them could possibly lose elections, if they are forced to vote on something as controversial as a path to citizenship
week. host: "the baltimore sun" has a story, "boehner ways next moves." this is from "the wall street journal." "post office hint of gop path." host: "she fit a profile." so, more on leadership, which both sides will be voting for this week when they return to washington on who will be their leaders. so, we will continue to watch that story for u.s. well. part of the mix to avoid the fiscal cliff is these jobless benefits. that is the headline in the politics and policy section of "the washington post." "over 2 million americans could lose their jobless benefits before the end of the year." host: susan, michigan, what do you think? should we cut medicare and social security? caller: absolutely not. absolutely not. host: why not? caller: i am a woman who has finally reached the age of social security. all the years the work, this money was taken out of my paycheck. i was told from a very young age that when i reached a fine age of the period where you retire and you can get social security, that all the money that i paid in would be refunded to me. this money is not to be touched, not
john boehner, eric cantor who will stay on with those rules that have had since 2011 when republicans took control of the house. in terms of strategy and approach, we are dealing with the same players we were dealing with before the election. host: turning toward the senate, what is the news there? caller: a lot of the same there as well. the republicans and democrats met yesterday morning behind closed doors and basically reelected the same leaders should have said for some time now. harry reid on the democratic side. on the republican side of mitch mcconnell and john corn and who is coming off of two cycles on the republican campaign committee. he will be replacing john kyl who is retiring. another couple of people down the ladder were reelected. there was an opening for for the campaign committee slot. thank you for talking with us. our question this morning is your level of confidence in the white house national security team. let's hear from carrie from michigan. caller: good morning. can you hear me? i think this is another cover up for the republican party. look at what condole
. the caucus urges you to join speaker boehner today in the rayburn room at 11:00 a.m. as he honors dr. james billington and his exemplary quarter century of leadership at the library of congress. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from new jersey rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> madam speaker, i rise to congratulate mr. wade martin of montgomery township, new jersey, for being awarded the 2012 land trust alliances prestigious national conservation service award for his significant contributions to the advancement of land conservation. mr. lance: using his position as financial advisor, mr. martin is educating his clients to the benefits of land preservation. his provided land trust and owners across new jersey for the benefit of land conservation. wade martin has taken his innovative land model nationwide to other financial advisors and their clients explore various options in preserving their land and their families' legacies, increasing the pace of land conservation. i ask all of my colleagues to join me in honoring wade martin as one of the na
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8